The fundamentals that interests me in biology is the way in which the body fights against pathogens and how astonishingly complex, yet logical the mechanisms and processes function to eradicate foreign microorganisms. I believe that the most prominent ability we humans obtain through the means of evolution is the trait of distinguishing which cells in your body are advantageous and which are injurious by the different variations of proteins on the cell surface membrane. Studying biomedical science at degree level would enhance my knowledge on a vast quantity of interesting topics such as, Molecular biology, Biochemistry and Genetics that view life at a microscopic level. My passion for biology emerged as I recognised the knowledge received from the subject could be used to manipulate all life on earth for the greater good and help individuals in need.
Studying biology and chemistry at A-level has improved my academic abilities drastically. Chemistry consists of challenging yet rational question which has improved my numerical skills, whereas Biology has improved both my analytic and laboratory abilities. For example, investigating which antibiotic inhibits the replication of bacteria more efficiently by the size of the inhibition zone. Furthermore, another skill I have learned through biology is applying newly obtained knowledge into real life scenarios, which is a vital and mandatory skill in the branch of Biomedical Science.
Completing independent research on the history and development on penicillin revealed to me how important chemistry is to biology and vice versa. Biologically, penicillin is viewed as a drug that is required to eliminate pathogenic microorganisms in our body, whereas chemically we can establish that the four mandatory structures required for penicillin to function are the ?-lactam ring, thiazolidine ring structure, free carboxyl acid group and a minimum of one amino acid side chain. I believe that my third A-level subject geography intensely assisted me in completing this research as essay based skills were obtained which in hand, improved my organisational skills which are essential for any university course. I have also read numerous electronic articles on the web page “The Scientist” to keep in touch in the world of medical research. One article that caught my attention was the development of organs into thumb sized chips, constructed by scientists at Harvard University. Overall, these articles are highly factual and have improved my day to day knowledge on biological research.
I successfully obtained work experience as a laboratory technician at my local secondary school. In doing so, I have gained experience in advance lab work which has encouraged me to be more independent and mentally stronger when it comes to practical labour. While quality checking approximately 3 dozen microscopes during work experience, I gained useful knowledge on how different variations of microscope function and how they can be reconditioned when inoperative. Furthermore, I also assisted with the school’s Annual STEM day by teaching individuals the difference between mitosis and meiosis and constructing feasible heat insulators for physics. Conclusively, work experience taught me how effective the use of science will be in the upcoming future in developing medical drugs, technology etc. that would enable humans to thrive.
As a versatile individual I’m involved in a number of activities which include football, volleyball and a part time job at a restaurant. Winning numerous awards in volleyball and football in both England and Ireland, I have learned that leadership and teamwork are the two most desired traits required for success. On the other hand, working at a restaurant has improved my communication skills, time management and organisation skills immensely.
As I aspire to become a biomedical scientist, I anxiously wait to broadening my knowledge and contribute towards further education to enable me to accomplish my everlasting goals.