In conclusion it is evident that the Canadian healthcare system is in a economic crisis. With Canada’s population continuing to increase, over 7% increase in the elderly by 2030 which they use about 45% of our healthcare budget,  pharmaceutical companies charging excessive amounts to our governments while our government turns blind eye to cheaper alternative medicine. The future of Canadian “free healthcare” is at risk. Fraser Institute has projected that provinces throughout Canada will be forced to increase their budget towards healthcare which will results in cut budgeting towards other programs and higher taxes. The effect of these problems projects that health care budgeting by provincial governments will go up by approximately 6.3 percent per annually over the next 15 years – increasing a whooping 151.4% from $144.3 billion in 2015 to $362.6 billion by 2030 (Terry 2017). As healthcare being the highest budgeted program in Canada it raises the question if the medical funding required by these facilities would be achievable. Maneet SinghMr.ShackCIA4U0-A10 January 2018 Canada’s Healthcare in a Economic CrisisHealthcare is the most financially funded social service in all of Canada. It is impossible for healthcare expenditure to increase the way it did 10 years ago today without making compromises to other sectors. Healthcare in 7 provinces by 2031 is projected to consume about 45% of the total program spending (British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia Ontario, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Alberta). Canada’s healthcare is in a economic crisis, In order for Governments to keep up with the increasingly expensive service they must reduce other program budgets such as public schools, bus services, parks and recreation etc. Government also may be required to make drastic changes such as raise taxes, collect higher deficits and debts and take more financial risks (Barua 2017). From 2001-2016 healthcare spending has increased a substantial 116% and governments realized they have peaked there allocated budget towards healthcare(Emes 2017). Compromises must be made in order to increase spending for the program or they will remain the same efficiency which will not be enough for hospitals to run smoothly (Palacios 2017). Due to the lack of funding/crisis, hospitals now face prolonged work hours, shortage in cleaning staff, faster patient discharge rates and the long wait times for patients to receive treatment. Budgeting has peaked and the problems are at a all-time high in the hospital’s and healthcare budgets are not enough for hospitals. In the past five years spending has peaked according to Fraser Institute of Canada and hospital are to remain the same with long treatment wait times, hygienic problems and prolonged hours of work. The reason behind these problems is due to the funding provided by governments not being enough for hospitals, increasing population and the high cost of pharmaceuticals. A primary factor that displays Canada’s healthcare crisis is population growth and the elderly. As the population increases or decreases the government must be able provide the extra funding required. Canada accepts about a quarter million immigrants each year (Butler 2014). This will be a difficult task for Canada to keep up with as their population increases they must increase healthcare expenditure. Biologically it is clear that the older you get (age 65+) the more prone you are to contracting disease and unwanted viruses, keeping that in mind, the population of the elderly is expected to rise from 16.5% in 2016 to 22.8% by 2030 (figure 7). The elderly account for 45% of all healthcare expenditure (figure 8). This is important data because Canadian research has shown that elderly 65+ consume 45% of the healthcare expenditure (CIHI 2015). Which will take out a huge chunk of the budget and resulting in less for the other age groups creating more problems for the government as they will have to increase money given towards hospitals. Canada is projected to fund hospitals at a much higher rate in the coming years but this increase will come at a cost of other programs. We will see reduced public services, parks and recreation, public schools, higher taxes and debts and deficits. The Canadian government has given as much money as possible to hospitals without impacting other sector’s and social services. But now the time has come and it is evident that other programs and services must suffer in order to keep the Canadian healthcare system in order and to be efficient. we project that health care spending will continue to represent an increasing portion of total program spending, going up from 40.6 percent in 2015 to 47.6 percent by 2030 Canada is projected to fund hospitals at a much higher rate in the coming years but this increase will come at a cost of other programs. We will see reduced public services, parks and recreation, public schools, higher taxes and debts and deficits. The Canadian government has given as much money as possible to hospitals without impacting other sector’s and social services. But now the time has come and it is evident that other programs and services must suffer in order to keep the Canadian healthcare system in order and to be efficient. we project that health care spending will continue to represent an increasing portion of total program spending, going up from 40.6 percent in 2015 to 47.6 percent by 2030 Lastly the problem and economic crisis is due to the expensive pharmaceuticals that must be bought for hospitals.Canada is the only nation in the entire world that has universal healthcare but no universal drug coverage. Canada wasted $15 billion over the last five years on highly priced prescription drugs (Herbert 2017). Experts say manipulation company success and fraud advertisement are the tools used to fool and deceive the government into buying their expensive medicine even though the company itself knows there are cheaper alternatives these problems are at the heart of the wasted spending. Also Canada pays the second highest prices in the world for drugs after first being the United States according to several studies. For example, hidden investigations discovered when one patient was sent to many doctors for a Type 2 diabetes diagnosis and was prescribed drugs  30 percent of the time doctors prescribed vastly more expensive drugs without first trying cheaper alternatives (Smith 2017).   In conclusion it is evident that the Canadian healthcare system is in a economic crisis. With Canada’s population continuing to increase, over 7% increase in the elderly by 2030 which they use about 45% of our healthcare budget,  pharmaceutical companies charging excessive amounts to our governments while our government turns blind eye to cheaper alternative medicine. The future of Canadian “free healthcare” is at risk. Fraser Institute has projected that provinces throughout Canada will be forced to increase their budget towards healthcare which will results in cut budgeting towards other programs and higher taxes. The effect of these problems projects that health care budgeting by provincial governments will go up by approximately 6.3 percent per annually over the next 15 years – increasing a whooping 151.4% from $144.3 billion in 2015 to $362.6 billion by 2030 (Terry 2017). As healthcare being the highest budgeted program in Canada it raises the question if the medical funding required by these facilities would be achievable. In conclusion it is evident that the Canadian healthcare system is in a economic crisis. With Canada’s population continuing to increase, over 7% increase in the elderly by 2030 which they use about 45% of our healthcare budget,  pharmaceutical companies charging excessive amounts to our governments while our government turns blind eye to cheaper alternative medicine. The future of Canadian “free healthcare” is at risk. Fraser Institute has projected that provinces throughout Canada will be forced to increase their budget towards healthcare which will results in cut budgeting towards other programs and higher taxes. The effect of these problems projects that health care budgeting by provincial governments will go up by approximately 6.3 percent per annually over the next 15 years – increasing a whooping 151.4% from $144.3 billion in 2015 to $362.6 billion by 2030 (Terry 2017). As healthcare being the highest budgeted program in Canada it raises the question if the medical funding required by these facilities would be achievable. In conclusion it is evident that the Canadian healthcare system is in a economic crisis. With Canada’s population continuing to increase, over 7% increase in the elderly by 2030 which they use about 45% of our healthcare budget,  pharmaceutical companies charging excessive amounts to our governments while our government turns blind eye to cheaper alternative medicine. The future of Canadian “free healthcare” is at risk. Fraser Institute has projected that provinces throughout Canada will be forced to increase their budget towards healthcare which will results in cut budgeting towards other programs and higher taxes. The effect of these problems projects that health care budgeting by provincial governments will go up by approximately 6.3 percent per annually over the next 15 years – increasing a whooping 151.4% from $144.3 billion in 2015 to $362.6 billion by 2030 (Terry 2017). As healthcare being the highest budgeted program in Canada it raises the question if the medical funding required by these facilities would be achievable. In conclusion it is evident that the Canadian healthcare system is in a economic crisis. With Canada’s population continuing to increase, over 7% increase in the elderly by 2030 which they use about 45% of our healthcare budget,  pharmaceutical companies charging excessive amounts to our governments while our government turns blind eye to cheaper alternative medicine. The future of Canadian “free healthcare” is at risk. Fraser Institute has projected that provinces throughout Canada will be forced to increase their budget towards healthcare which will results in cut budgeting towards other programs and higher taxes. The effect of these problems projects that health care budgeting by provincial governments will go up by approximately 6.3 percent per annually over the next 15 years – increasing a whooping 151.4% from $144.3 billion in 2015 to $362.6 billion by 2030 (Terry 2017). As healthcare being the highest budgeted program in Canada it raises the question if the medical funding required by these facilities would be achievable. In conclusion it is evident that the Canadian healthcare system is in a economic crisis. With Canada’s population continuing to increase, over 7% increase in the elderly by 2030 which they use about 45% of our healthcare budget,  pharmaceutical companies charging excessive amounts to our governments while our government turns blind eye to cheaper alternative medicine. The future of Canadian “free healthcare” is at risk. Fraser Institute has projected that provinces throughout Canada will be forced to increase their budget towards healthcare which will results in cut budgeting towards other programs and higher taxes. The effect of these problems projects that health care budgeting by provincial governments will go up by approximately 6.3 percent per annually over the next 15 years – increasing a whooping 151.4% from $144.3 billion in 2015 to $362.6 billion by 2030 (Terry 2017). As healthcare being the highest budgeted program in Canada it raises the question if the medical funding required by these facilities would be achievable.